Sarcophagus of Wahibreemakhet

Step 15 of 17

Two sisters

Related images

Fig. 1 - Isis – MET – [17.190.1641](https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/553034?searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=17.190.1641&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=1)Fig. 2 - Nephthys – RMO – [L.VI.69](https://hdl.handle.net/21.12126/13172)Fig. 3 - Nephthys and Isis – MET – [2016.77](https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/551861?searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=2016.77&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=1)

These two winged goddesses are Isis (on the left, also fig. 1) and Nephthys (on the right, also fig. 2). Both goddesses are holding ostrich feathers in their hands and have the hieroglyphic writing of their name on top of their heads. Because of their role within Egyptian mythology, they were associated with the protection of the deceased and are often portrayed in a funerary context (see fig. 3) and on sarcophagi.

Osiris, Isis’ husband, was the king of Egypt until he was killed by his brother Seth in a mythical power struggle. Seth cut Osiris into pieces and scattered him all over Egypt. Isis and her sister Nephthys mourned him and travelled all over Egypt to try and find all the scattered pieces of Osiris. By using Isis’ magic, they managed to revive Osiris. Through his revived status Osiris became the king of the Netherworld. R. Wilkinson, The complete gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt (New York, 2003), 146, 159.