Sarcophagus of Wahibreemakhet

Step 10 of 17

Duamutef

Related images

Fig. 7 - Canopic jar of Wahibreemakhet – Medelhavsmuseet – [NME 098](https://collections.smvk.se/carlotta-mhm/web/object/3016073)Fig. 2 – Neith – MET – [26.7.846](https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/550888?searchField=All&sortBy=Relevance&ft=26.7.846&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=1)

The next son of Horus is Duamutef. He is depicted with the head of a jackal. The hieroglyphic text in the columns above and around him read:

Words spoken by Duamutef: I am your son, Horus, your beloved. I have come to protect my father, Osiris Wahibreemakhet. I place your enemy under your sandals.

Duamutef protected the stomach (see fig. 1 for a canopic jar belonging to Wahibreemakhet, also depicting Duamutef). J. Taylor, ‘The Mummy in the Tomb’, in J. Taylor (ed.)Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead : journey through the afterlife (London, 2010), 106-107.

Duamutef was protected by the goddess Neith (fig. 2), a warrior goddess closely associated with burial. She played an important role in the protection of the deceased. Neith is depicted on the sarcophagus, standing underneath the god she is protecting: Duamutef. R. Wilkinson, The complete gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt (New York, 2003), 156-157.